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Wrexham

 

Wrexham

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Wrexham (Welsh: Wrecsam) is an industrial town and sizeable urban area in north-east Wales, close to the English border with Cheshire. It is the main commercial, educational and cultural centre in North Wales, and often termed 'The capital of North Wales'. It is the administrative centre of the county borough of Wrexham. The town itself has a population of 43,000 (although its metropolitan area is well over 100,000) and is thus the largest town in North Wales. The entire county borough has a population of 130,200.
History
Prehistoric and Roman times
There is evidence of prehistoric activity in the Wrexham area. Evidence of occupation during Roman times was found during the construction of the Plas Coch Retail Park outside the town centre.

Middle Ages
Wrexham is not mentioned in the Domesday Book; the first mention of it comes in 1161 by which time there was a Norman motte and bailey castle at 'Wristlesham', however, being well to the east of Offa's Dyke, there has probably been a settlement there since Saxon times.

The town became part of the county of Denbighshire when it was created in 1536. Wrexham was divided into two distinct townships, Wrexham Regis (which was under the control of the King) and Wrexham Abbot (generally the older parts of the town, which originally belonged to Valle Crucis Abbey at nearby Llangollen).

During the English Civil War, Wrexham was on the side of the Royalists as most Welsh gentry supported the king, even though local landowner Sir Thomas Myddelton, owner of Chirk castle gave his support to Parliament. Wrexham became the main town in the area and grew wealthy with its markets.

Nineteenth and twentieth centuries
Wrexham was formerly one of the most industrialised areas in Wales. One of its main industries was brewing and there were several large breweries in the town, together with many smaller breweries situated at the back of local inns. Some of the more famous old breweries were the Albion, Cambrian, Eagle, Island Green, Soames and Willow. However, the most famous was the Wrexham Lager brewery which was built between 1881 and 1882 in Central Road. This was the first brewery to be built in the United Kingdom to produce lager beer. Another major producer, Border Breweries, was formed in 1931 by a merger of several of the existing smaller breweries. All commercial brewing in Wrexham has now ceased.

Bricks were produced in Abenbury, on the outskirts of Wrexham. The brickworks was sited on both sides of the Abenbury Road.

Coal mining was an important industry in the area, and provided employment for large numbers of Wrexham people, however most of the mines were situated well outside of the town centre. Wrexham's coal field was part of the larger North East Wales field. A number of deep mines were constructed throughout the area including Llay, Gresford, Bersham and Johnstown. A number of new settlements were built on the edge of the town to accommodate miners at a number of the sites including Llay and Pandy (for Gresford).

Other forms of mining and quarrying have taken place around Wrexham throughout its history, these include Lead extracted from Minera. All mining and most quarrying has now ceased in the area.

One legacy of Wrexham's industrial past was the Wrexham area's large and complex network of railways, the main branch being the Wrexham and Minera Branch, which supported the steelworks at nearby Brymbo Steel Mill and the Minera Limeworks. The rail network was torn up in the 1960s - Beeching Axe (and the Minera Branch in the early 1970s). Wrexham began a period of depression: the many coal mines closed first, followed by the brickworks and other industries, and finally the steelworks (which had its own railway branch up until closure) in the 1980s. Wrexham faced an economic crisis: with residents anxious to sell their homes and move to areas with better employment prospects, but buyers were uninterested in an area where there was little employment. Many people were caught in a negative equity trap. Wrexham was suffering from the same problems as much of Industrialised Britain and saw little investment in the 1970s.

The 90's to present day
In the 1980s and 1990s, the Welsh Development Agency (WDA) intervened to improve Wrexham's situation: it funded a major dual carriageway called the A483 bypassing Wrexham town centre and connecting it with Chester and Shrewsbury, which in turn had connections with other big cities such as Manchester and Liverpool. It also funded shops and reclaimed areas environmentally damaged by the coal industry. The town centre was regenerated and attracted a growing number of high street names- BHS, McDonalds, Game, Burger King, HMV, KFC and other major retail chains came to Wrexham. The biggest breakthrough was the Wrexham Industrial Estate, home to many manufacturing businesses including Kellogg's, JCB, Duracell and Pirelli. There are also a number of other large industrial estates with companies such as Sharp, Brother, Cadbury, and Flexsys. The dual carriageway was extended halfway to the Estate in 2003, and is expected to reach it by 2011.

The high land prices in the town mean that apartments and flats within the town centre have been built. This is leading to large apartment blocks being built in and around the town centre.

In June 2003, the Caia Park estate in Wrexham was hit by riots, when local youths attacked several Iraqi Kurds living in the area, believing that they had been given preferential treatment due to their status as asylum seekers. Police were brought into the estate and petrol bombs and other missiles were hurled at them, causing a major riot.

Current Developments & Regeneration
Recent years have seen a large amount of redevelopment in Wrexham's town centre. The creation and re-development of civic and public areas such as Queens Square, Belle Vue Park and Llwyn Isaf have improved the area dramtically. New shopping areas have been created at Henblas Square and Island Green and major development is currently taking place at Eagles Meadow - a fairly large area of land between St. Giles and the inner ring road. The £100m+ development when completed will increase Wrexham's retail area by over 400,000 sq feet and house a large range of high quality retail outlets, bars, restaurants, cinema, bowling alley and new penthouse apartments. Already commited to the development are Debenhams, M&S, Next, H&M, River Island, TenPin and Odeon. The development is being carried out by Wilson Bowden and WB City Homes. It will include public areas and an iconic bridge to connect the development with the old High Street. The main street in the development is designed to give spectacular views of St. Giles Church The housing boom is also being felt in Wrexham. The central area has seen a number conversions and new build apartment complexes. Currently apartments are planned for a large area off Mold Road (close to the Football ground) and on Salop road (close to Eagles Meadow), and near the Island Green shopping complex. Outside of the town centre new build estates are being developed in Brymbo (former steelworks site), Wrexham Western Gateway site (Ruthin Road) and Mold Road.Plans have been unveiled for a £17m waste processing centre for Wrexham which will help reduce the amount of waste going to landfill sites. It is believed the centre will be built on Wrexham's industrial estate and run by Spanish-owned Waste Recycling Group.

City status
Wrexham is now the largest settlement in North Wales, and has applied for city status several times, most recently in 2002 as part of the celebrations for the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II, along with Aberystwyth, Machynlleth, Newtown, Newport and St Asaph. In the end, Wrexham lost out to Newport, which has more than three times Wrexham's population. Wrexham county borough is among the smallest local authorities in north Wales by area. Although several attempts have been made to enlarge the local authority, other towns, such as Llangollen have rejected it, as there is a lot of "town rivalry" with neighbouring towns and cities, particularly Chester.

Culture
Arts

Wrexham hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1888, 1912, 1933 and 1977, as well as an unofficial National Eisteddfod event in 1876. Wrexham has a number of theatres, including the Grove Park Theatre on Vicarage Hill and the Yale Studio theatre close to Llwyn Isaf. The main Arts centre is at Wrexham County Library, with others at NEWI in Plas Coch and Yale College. There is a multi-screen Odeon cinema in the Plas Coch retail park just outside the town centre, with another planned at the new Eagles Meadow development - due to open 2008. The nearby town of Llangollen holds the International Musical Eisteddfod every July.

Music
Wrexham has built a vibrant music scence over the last few years. In 2007 it featured on BBC Radio One's Steve Lamac show, and regularly features on the Welsh music portion of the station. The main live music venue in Wrexham is Central Station, a club with a capacity of approximately 650, attracting touring bands from across the country. Since its opening in 2000 the venue has played host to hundreds of acts, including The Charlatans, the Scratch Perverts, Ash, The View, The Wildhearts, Mansun, Shed Seven, The Wonder Stuff, Skindred, Supersuckers, Moscow, Bloc Party, Hundred Reasons, Bloc Party, Grandmaster Flash, Electric Six, Trashlight Vision, The Fall, Budgie, Crosbi, The Blackout, Kids in Glass Houses, Rooster and Robert Plant.

Another live music venue in Wrexham is the William Aston Hall at NEWI. It hosts concerts and live entertainment. This 900-seat venue has recently undergone extensive refurbishment, and is now designed to accommodate a range of events from conferences and exhibitions to theatrical performances and pop/rock concerts. Acts who have performed there in the past include Super Furry Animals, Love, Ray Davies, Funeral for a Friend, Freddie Starr and Sweet.

Media
Wrexham's newspapers include the free Wrexham Mail, the Wrexham Evening Leader, and the weekly broadsheet Wrexham Leader, often known as the "Big Leader". Two radio stations, Marcher Sound and Classic Gold Marcher, serve the town. Television stations BBC Wales, ITV Wales and S4C also have bureaux in the town for their regional news services.

Nightlife
Wrexham has a vibrant nightlife mainly centered around the older original parts of the town close to the St. Giles Church along High Street, Town Hill and Brook Street. Some of the more popular bars include Lloyds, Bar Cuprum, Yates, Vialoto, Milliners, Sugar Reef, Cafe Zouk, Fat Cat Cafe Bar, Chequers, 1-5, Barracuda, Yales Cafe/Bar, Honky Tonks, the Commercial, South Central, Chicago Rock Cafe and Sgt Peppers. Nightclubs inclue Liquid, Envy, Scotts, Central Station (including live music venue) and the Centenary Club (at Wrexham FC)

Heritage
Wrexham's former police station on Regent Street, originally the barracks for the Royal Denbigshire Militia, is now home to Wrexham County Borough Museum. The museum has two galleries devoted to the history of the town and its surrounding communities. There is also a programme of temporary exhibitions, including last year an exhibition featuring the Mold Cape, the first time the Bronze Age treasure had returned to North Wales since its discovery in 1833. Just to the west of the town, Bersham Heritage Centre and Ironworks tell the story of John Wilkinson, the 'Iron Mad' pioneer of the Industrial Revolution. At the top end of the Clywedog Valley, about ten minutes' drive from Wrexham, Minera Lead Mines are the remains of the profitable lead industry that dates back to prehistoric times.

Just to the east of Wrexham, there are the few remains of Holt Castle. The castle and the nearby late medieval bridge were the scene of constant skirmishes during the Civil War in the 17th century. The bridge was the entrance to North Wales and of vital strategic importance.

Just 2 miles south of Wrexham town centre, Erddig, the National Trust property, was home to the Yorke family until 1973. Its last resident, Philip Yorke, handed over a house in need of restoration as years of subsidence caused by the workings of Bersham Colliery had caused a lot of damage. The house was voted one of the two most popular Stately homes in the UK by a National Trust / Channel 5 publication. However, the house was not popular with Bersham miners as it stood on a pillar of coal and they had to work round it.

Wrexham's mining heritage is nearly all gone. Most former mines have been converted into industrial and business parks - one such development at Bersham Colliery has the last surviving headgear in the North Wales coalfield. Just off the A483, on the edge of Wrexham, the Gresford Disaster Memorial stands witness to the 261 miners, 2 rescuemen and one surface worker killed by a series of explosions in the Gresford Collery in 1934.

Religion
St. Gile’s Church, Wrexham is the parish church of Wrexham and includes a colourful ceiling of flying musical angels, two early eagle lecterns, a window by the artist Edward Burne-Jones and the Royal Welch Fusiliers chapel. In the graveyard is the tomb of Elihu Yale who was the benefactor of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, USA and after whom Yale College Wrexham is named. The tower of St. Giles is claimed as one of the 'Seven Wonders of Wales' and the tower of Yale University reflects its design. The Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of Sorrows, in Regent Street, is the main church of the Diocese of Wrexham, which extends over all of the north of Wales. Wrexham also has a number of non-denominational chapels and Churches scattered about the town. The main Methodist church is in Brynyffynon, off Regent Street. Up until the 1970s the town was full of Welsh non-denominational Chapels and the attendance of these was far in excess of that of the Anglican Church in the town.

In the past, Wrexham had a church with a spire much taller than the St Giles steeple dedicated and named after St Mark, but this was demolished as the building's foundations were in danger of collapse. A multi-storey car park named "St Marks" was erected on the site.

Sport
Football & Rugby

The town has a professional football team, Wrexham AFC, which competes in the Football League. Currently managed by Brian Carey and his assistant Steve Weaver, the club has a rich 130 year history and is perhaps most notable for an FA Cup upset over Arsenal F.C. in 1992, together with a number of European Cup Winners Cup runs in the 1970s. Despite the attempt to knock down the club's historic Racecourse Ground and replace it with a shopping development in 2005/06, the club's future is now assured, thanks to a consortium of local businessmen led by a local car dealer Neville Dickens. The town end of the ground is due for redevelopment in the 2007/8 season, which will see a new stand and a number of high quality apartments built.

On Saturday May 5th 2007 Wrexham AFC preserved its Football League status with a 3-1 win over Boston United.

The ground has in the past also served as the secondary home of the Llanelli Scarlets, one of the four Welsh professional rugby sides that compete in the Magners sponsored Celtic League. They would play, on average, two games per season there, though since the problems experienced by Wrexham FC during its period in administration, and uncertainty over the future of the ground, there were no Llanelli Scarlets games played there in season 2005-6 nor are any games scheduled for the 2006-7 Magners League season. Liverpool FC Reserves also play their home fixtures here, as do the Welsh international rugby team on occasion.

Extreme & Oudoor Sports
Wrexham's close proximity to the Welsh mountains makes it an ideal base for outdoor sports. Just 8 miles from Wrexham town centre the Coed Llandegla Forest Mountain Biking centre is home to some of Wales' best cross country trails. Work is due to commence shortly on one of Britain's top ski centres. Located on the site of the former Gresford Coal mine (Just off the A483), the centre will include a downhill artificial surface along with the UK's first professional ski jump.

Other Sports

  • Tennis: Wrexham is home to one of the UK's best Tennis complexes. Situated in Plas Coch the North Wales Regional Tennis Centre plays host to a number of international competitions each year including the 'Challenger' Series. The centre is also home to the Wrexham Lawn Tennis Association.
  • Athletics: Queensway International Athletics stadium in Caia Park is Wrexham's second stadium after the Racecourse and has hosted the Welsh Open Athletics event in recent years.
  • Hockey: Plas Coch is home to the North Wales Regional Hockey Stadium, a water-based international FIH accredited facility with seating for 200 spectators and floodlighting. The stadium is due to host the 2007 Celtic Cup in July this year.
  • Basketball: The recently formed NEWI Nets are North Wales' premier BBall team and currently compete in English Division 2. 2006/7 season finishing 5th. They play at NEWI's Plas Coch sports arena.

Tourism
Up until recently Wrexham was never marketed as a tourist destination. Always overshadowed by the prestigious Roman City of Chester, just over the border. However, since the turn of the century the industry has started to attract an increasing number of visitors. The town and county has some wide and diverse attractions, from statley homes and countryside to science discovery and leisure. The close proximity of Wrexham to the mountains of Snowdonia and the Berwyns makes its an ideal base for activity breaks.

Education
Wrexham has a number of primary and secondary schools. It has just one Welsh speaking secondary school, that being Ysgol Morgan Llwyd. Recently, three of the largest secondary schools, St David's School, Ysgol Bryn Offa and The Groves High School were merged to create two larger "super schools", Ysgol Clywedog and Rhosnesni High. Wrexham has also become home to the first shared faith school in Wales in the form of St Joseph's. Yale College is the main post-16 education facility. Wrexham is also home to the newest University of Wales college, the North East Wales Institute of Higher Education (NEWI). This incorporates the North Wales School of Art and Design. NEWI is currently seeking full university status as the future University of Wales, Wrexham.

Politics
Wrexham County Borough Council elects a mayor who serves for one year. The current mayor of Wrexham is Councillor George D James. Wrexham Council's website, is one of the leading council websites in the country. People who live under the jurisdiction of Wrexham County Borough Council are able to pay taxes, debts and other fees through the website. They can also access many other services, such as reporting crimes, submitting planning applications and applying for permits.

The Wrexham constituency elects members to the UK Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales. The constituency includes both the town and some of its outlying villages such as Gwersyllt, Llay, Marford and Rossett.

The UK Parliament constituency of Wrexham has long been a safe seat for the Labour Party. The current Member of Parliament is Ian Lucas, and the Assembly Member for the National Assembly for Wales constituency of Wrexham is Lesley Griffiths.

Transport
Wrexham has various links to the transport network, with two railway stations and a large bus station. Wrexham General station provides direct rail services to Chester, Shrewsbury, Wolverhampton, Birmingham, Cardiff, Bangor and Holyhead while Wrexham Central station provides direct rail services to Gwersyllt, Hope, Penyffordd, Hawarden, Buckley, Shotton and Bidston, Merseyside via the Borderlands Line.

A recent focus on road transport by the council has improved the bus travel in the Wrexham area, with most buses being low-floor and slightly elevated bus stops to allow people easier access to buses. A new bus terminal in Wrexham has been built. It is the largest in north Wales, featuring indoor shops and ambient music, along with a staffed information booth. The bus station serves local, regional and long-distance bus services.

Wrexham is one of the first areas in the United Kingdom to adopt the use of American Bluebird school buses. 10 currently operate in the Wrexham area, transporting pupils to and from the schools and colleges.

The Future
Wrexham has many major plans for the future. The WDA (Welsh Development Agency) (now disbanded), had earmarked Wrexham as a potential transport hub. The UK capital of culture for 2008, Liverpool, has also donated £100,000 to a study of electrification of the Wrexham to Bidston line, and a possible rail link to the North Wales coast line. This will open new rail links to the east, and the urban area of Liverpool.

With house prices rising rapidly in this area, the council has made many plans for massive suburban housing estates to be built. One, near Ysgol Clywedog, will include a small shopping centre and another primary school.

On 30 January 2006, it was announced that a new railway company, named the Wrexham Shropshire and Marylebone Railway (WSMR), had been formed. It plans to run a fast or high speed rail service from Wrexham, through Shrewsbury to London's Marylebone station. The announcement made it unclear as to whether it will use locomotive hauled trains or high speed DMU trains, but it was mentioned that the line to Shrewsbury may need infrastructural upgrades to handle high speed trains.


 Trains in Wrexham:
 Wrexham is on the Borderlands Line
 Wrexham is on the Shrewsbury-Chester Line


 Museums in Wrexham:
 Bersham Ironworks

 County Borough Museum
       County Buildings
       Regent Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1RB
 01978 317970


 Cinemas in Wrexham:
 Odeon
       Plas Coch Retail Park
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 6TE
 http://www.odeon.co.uk/fanatic/film_times/s144/


 Libraries in Wrexham:
 Wrexham Library
       Rhosddu Road
       Wrexham
       LL11 1AU
 01978 292090
 Mon 9.00 am-7.00 pm
       Tue 9.00 am-7.00 pm
       Wed 9.00 am-7.00 pm
       Thur 9.00 am-7.00 pm
       Fri 9.00 am-7.00 pm
       Sat 9.00 am-4.00 pm


 Farmers Markets in Wrexham:
 Wrexham Farmers Market
       Queens Square
       Wrexham
       LL11 5DY
 9.30am-1:00pm Third Friday each month
 01987 292 010


 Rugby in Wrexham: Wrexham RFC


 Football in Wrexham:
 Borras Park Albion FC
 Brickfield Rangers FC
 Gap Queens Park FC
 Lex XI FC
 Wrexham FC


 Tennis in Wrexham:
 North Wales Regional Tennis Centre
       Plas Coch Road
       Wrexham
       LL11 2BW
       Clwyd
 01978 265260
 01978 362730

 Wrexham Lawn Tennis Club
       North Wales Regional Tennis Centre
       Plas Coch Road
       Wrexham
       LL11 2BW
       Clwyd
 01978 265 260
 http://www.theguide-uk.com/tennis_wltc


 Theatres in Wrexham:
 Grove Park Theatre
       Hill Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1SN
 01978 261524


 Vets in Wrexham:
 Borras Park Veterinary Surgery
       2 Borras Park Rd
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7TG
 01978 310131

 Rhyd Broughton Veterinary Group
       55 Chester St
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BA
 01978 290349


 Tourist Information Centres in Wrexham:

 Telephone:

01978 292015

 Fax:

01978 292467

 Email:

tic@wrexham.gov.uk

 Address:

Lambpit Street
Wrexham
LL11 1WN

 Hours:

Winter Monday - Saturday  10:00 - 16:00
Summer
Monday - Saturday  10:00 - 17:00


 Pubs/Bars in Wrexham:
 1-5 Public House
       1-5 Town Hill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NA
 01978 313237

 Abbotsfield Priory Hotel
       29 Rhosddu Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2LP

 The Acton Park Hotel
       110 Chester Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2SN
 01978 340014

 Aiden Brady's
       Abbot Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1TA
 01978 313039

 The Amble Inn
       23 Bridge Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HP

 The Barracuda Bar
       7-15 Townhill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NA
 01978 366750

 Belmont Hotel
       Belmont Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7PW

 The Black Horse
       Yorke Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LW
 01978 310880

 Bowling Green
       43 Pen y Bryn
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HU
 01978 364706

 Brooks Wine Bar
       35 Brook Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7LH
 01978 366616

 Bridge Inn
       Chirk Bank
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 5BU
 01691 773213

 The Caernarvon
       11 Caernarvon Inn Bridge Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HP

 Caia House
       Caia Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DS

 Cambrian Vaults
       Town Hill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NA

 Central Station
       15-17 Hill Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1SN
 01978 358780

 City Arms
       Wern Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 3DU

 Cosmopolitan Cafe Bar
       25 High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HY

 Chequers Wine Bar
       7-9 Church Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LS
 01978 290910

 Club K1
       32-36 Bridge Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HP
 01978 352011

 Cross Foxes Inn
       High Street
       Pentre Broughton
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 6AW

 The Cross Foxes
       Abbot Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1TA

 Cunliffe Arms
       Jeffreys Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7PG
 01978 354206

 The Elephant & Castle
       13 Charles Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BT

 Elihu Yale
       44-46 Regent Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1RR
 01978 366646

 Fairfield Tavern
       57 Erddig Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7DW
 01978 366841

 Fat Cat Cafe Bar
       Lord Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1LS
 01978 266791

 The Ffrwd
       Briarcroft Ffrith
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 9TR

 Fairfield Tavern
       57 Erddig Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7DW

 The Feathers Hotel
       Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BA
 01978 363097

 Forte Travelodge
       Wrexham Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 4EJ

 Four Dogs
       Box Lane
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 8EF
 01978 355627

 The Gate Hangs High
       Rhosnesni Lane
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9ES
 01978 356718

 Golden Lion
       High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HP
 01978 340051

 The Goulbourne
       Borras Park Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7TE
 01978 364505

 Grapes Inn
       Maelor Road
       Johnstown
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 1NB

 The Gredington Arms
       Holt Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9SD

 The Green Dragon
       Salop Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7AF

 Hand Inn
       Church Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 5EY
 01978 261397

 Honky Tonks
       7 Town Hill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NA
 01978 263519

 Horse & Jockey
       Hope Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1BG
 01978 351081

 The Jolly Masons
       Rock Road
       Rhosymedre
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 3YF

 The Kings Arms
       Bridge Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HP

 Kingsmills
       Kingsmills Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 0NS
 01978 364849

 Lloyds No.1
       14 High St
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HP
 01978 367940

 Malt House
       31 Caia Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DS
 01978 355275

 Milliners
       4-5 High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HP

 The Mitre Inn
       Pentrefelin
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7NB
 01978 261489

 Moors Inn
       Ruthin Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 3BW
 01978 755774

 Nags Head
       Ridley View
       Ridley Wood
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9US

 The Nags Head Inn
       Mount Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DW
 01978 261177

 The New Inn
       Wrexham Road
       Johnstown
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 1NU

 Oak Tree Tavern
       Ruabon Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7NY
 01978 261450

 The Old Vaults Inn
       5 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BD
 01978 364783

 One To Five
       1-5 Town Hill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NA
 01978 313237

 Plas Coch
       Plas Coch Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2BW
 01978 261470

 Plough Inn
       Park Road
       Rhosymedre
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 3EF

 Railway Inn
       Railway Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2DL
 01978 311172

 Red Cow Inn
       23 Pen Y Bryn
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HU

 The Red Dragon Inn
       Prince Charles Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8TG
 01978 364935

 Red Lion Inn
       Abenbury Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 0NT
 01978 352511

 The Red Wither Inn
       Redwither Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9RD

 Rollers Arms
       High Street
       Southsea
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 5PB

 The Royal Oak
       35 High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HY

 Scott's
       33-35 Brook Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7LH
 01978 290230

 Scruffy Murphys
       College Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LU

 Seven Stars Hotel
       18 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BG
 01978 263753

 The Smithfield Hotel
       1 Smithfield Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8EN

 The Squire Yorke
       Sontley Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7EN
 01978 261007

 Sugar Reef
       Abbot Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1TA
 01978 355975

 The Swan Inn
       Pen Y Bryn
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HY
 01978 313945

 Talbot Bar
       Queen Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1AP
 01978 261314

 Thirsty Scholar
       25 Egerton Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1NA
 01978 364443

 The Travellers Rest
       Kingsmills Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NH
 01978 261050

 Trevor Park Hotel
       9 Ruthin Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7NU

 Turf Hotel
       Mold Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2AH
 01978 261484

 The Walnut Tree
       130 Rhosddu Rd
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2NF
 01978 313327

 White Hart Inn
       High Street
       Pentre Broughton
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 6AG

 Wynnstay Arms Hotel
       Yorke Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LP

 Yates's Wine Lodge
       29 High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HY
 01978 262415

 Ye Olde Talbot Inn
       Cymau Road
       Cymau
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 5LB


 Hotels in Wrexham:
 Albion Vaults Hotel
       1 Pen Y Bryn
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HU
 01978 364969

 Belmont Hotel
       Belmont Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7PW
 01978 364655

 Best Western Cross Lanes Hotel
       Marchwiel
       Wrexham
       Wrexham
       LL13 0TF
 01978 780555
 guestservices@crosslanes.co.uk
 http://www.crosslanes.co.uk/Hotels in Wrexham:

 Wynnstay Arms Hotel
       Yorke Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LP
 01978 291010


 B&B's/Guesthouses in Wrexham:
 Grove Guest House
       36 Chester Road
       Wrexham
       LL11 2SD
 01978 354288
 Grove@grove-guesthouse.co.uk
 http://www.grove-guesthouse.co.uk/

 Hope Mountain Bed & Breakfast
       Ffynnon y Garreg
       Cymau
       Wrexham
       LL11 5EY
 01978 769058
 diggerandnorman@tiscali.co.uk

 Littleton B&B
       24 Bersham Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7UP 
 01978 352867
 littletonbandb@talk21.com

 

 The Stow B&B
       12 Hightown Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 8EB 
 01978 366255
 01978 366255
 thestowguesthouse@yahoo.co.uk

 The Willows
       Sontley
       Wrexham
       LL13 0YB
 01978 812179
 01978 812179
 info@willows-sontley.co.uk
 http://www.willows-sontley.co.uk

 The Windings B&B
       Cae Pen Ty Road
       Ffrwd Valley
       Wrexham
       LL12 9TH 
 01978 720503
 windings@enterprise.net
 http://www.stayinwales.co.uk/windings


 Golf in Wrexham:
 Moss Valley Golf Course
       Moss Road
       Wrexham
       LL11 6HA
 01978 720518

 Wrexham Golf Club
       Holt Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 9SB
 01978 364268

 Clays Farm Golf Centre
       Bryn Estyn Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 9UB
 01978 661406

 Pen-y-Cae Golf Club Ltd
       Ruabon Road
       Pen-y-Cae
       Wrexham
       LL14 1TW
 01978 810108

 Plassey Golf Club
       Eyton
       Near Wrexham
       Wrexham
       Ll13 0SP
 01978 780020

 Chirk Golf Club
       Chirk
       Wrexham
       LL14 5AD
 01691 774407


 Restaurants in Wrexham:
 Anise
       1 Smithfield Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8EN
 01978 266017

 Domelli's
       2-3 Overton Arcade
       High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HR
 01978 264600

 Dao Siam
       13 Charles Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BT
 01978 351071

 Deep Pan Pizza Co
       Retail Park
       Plas Coch Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2BA
 01978 362166

 Jamuna Tandoori
       18 Yorke Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LW
 01978 356899

 The Lemon Tree
       29 Rhosddu Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2LP
 01978 261211

 Moors Inn
       Ruthin Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 3BW
 01978 755774

 Sleepy Panda Restaurant
       Farndon Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DE
 01978 310700


 Cafes in Wrexham:
 A Marubbi & Son
       10 Bank Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1AH
 01978 266970

 Cafe De Galles
       4 Church Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8LS
 01978 355115

 The Candy Bar
       6-8 Henblas Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8AD
 01978 290600

 Christina's Cafe Continental
       56 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BA
 01978 312312

 The Gallery Coffee Shop
       21 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BG
 01978 362438

 Granny B's
       Peoples Market
       35 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8AH
 01978 311907

 Mrs G's
       12 Chester Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BE
 01978 350332

 Priory Street Cafe
       10 Priory Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1SU
 01978 352019

 Riverside Cafe
       Felin Puleston Industrial Estate
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7RF
 01978 366801

 Tomlinsons Cafe & Food To Go
       10 High Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HP
 01978 365776

 Tricia's Cafe
       15 Henblas Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8AD
 01978 366778

 Yales Cafe Bar
       15-17 Hill Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1SN
 01978 311857


 Take Aways in Wrexham:
 Borras Park Fish Bar (Fish and Chips)
       28 Borras Park Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7TH
 01978 351138

 Brambles
       5 Bank Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1AH
 01978 357022

 Burger King
       22-23 Queen Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1AL
 01978 366099

 Burger King Drive Through
       Holt Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HL
 01978 290955

 The Charcoal Grill Kebab
       24 Abbot Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1TA
 01978 263355

 Chicken-U-Like
       26 Town Hill
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NB
 01978 290723

 Eastern Touch Takeaway
       8 Brook Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7LL
 01978 363636

 Eddies Chippy (Fish and Chips)
       41 Pen Y Bryn
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7HU
 01978 262381

 Everland Fish Bar (Fish and Chips)
       Crescent Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8HF
 01978 358941

 Fongs Garden
       4-8 Borras Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7EG
 01978 313591

 Heaps (Fish and Chips)
       62-64 Poyser Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7RT
 01978 313343

 Hong Kong House
       Windsor Road
       New Broughton
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 6SR
 01978 755933

 Jones's Fish & Chip Shop
       43 St Georges Cresent
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DB
 01978 361169

 KFC
       Market Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8BY
 01978 262632

 Ko Sing
       38 Brook Street
       Wrexham
       ClwydL
       L13 7LL
 01978 357262

 Lucky House
       126 Rhosddu Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2NG
 01978 261296

 McDonald's Restaurants Ltd
       30-32 Regent Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1SA
 01978 358884

 The Mermaid Chippy (Fish and Chips)
       43 Kingsmills Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NH
 01978 261528

 The Pebble (Fish and Chips)
       2 Argyle Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1BA
 01978 352343

 Perfect Pizza
       3 Imperial Buildings
       King Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1HE
 01978 353232

 Rainbow House
       86 Smithfield Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8ER
 01978 359548

 Slowboat Chinese Takeaway
       22 Ruabon Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7PB
 01978 354628

 Stevie's Fast Food
       18 Bradley Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7TL
 01978 351181

 The Taste Of India
       34 Rhosnesni Lane
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL12 7NA
 01978 261820


 For Children in Wrexham:
 Abbeyfield Day Nursery
       Rhosnesni Farm
       Cefn Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9NF
 01978 355220

 Cherubs Day Nursery
       Main Road
       Old Rhosrobin
       Rhosrobin
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 4RL
 01978 366699

 Cherubs Day Nursery
       Stansty Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2BU
 01978 314430

 Mudiad Ysgorlin Meithrin (Playgroup)
       Carttrefle
       Cefn Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9NH
 01978 363279

 Saplings Childrens Nursery
       Wrexham Technology Park
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7YP
 01978 312444

 Toy Box (Nursery)
       Mold Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2AF
 01978 353881

 Wales PPA (Playgroup)
       Ty Avow
       21 Egerton Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1ND
 01978 358903


 Other in Wrexham:
 Magnet Social Club
       29 Centenary Buildings
       King Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1HH
 01978 357758

 Plas Coch Sports Centre at Newi
       Plas Coch College
       Mold Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2AW
 01978 293275

 Queensway Sports & Social Club
       Queensway
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8UH
 01978 261182

 The Royal British Legion
       Bersham Road
       Bersham
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL14 4HS
 01978 261277

 St Mary's Catholic Club
       Regent Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1RB
 01978 261387

 Wrexham AFC Ltd
       Mold Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2AH
 01978 262129

 Wrexham AFC Community Programme
       Mold Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 2AH
 01978 262129

 Wrexham & District War Memorial Club Ltd
       Farndon Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8DE
 01978 356865

 Wrexham Lager Sports & Social Club
       1 Union Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7SR
 01978 310909

 Wrexham Musical Theatre Society
       1 Salop Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7AF
 01978 261148

 Wrexham Rail Sports & Social Club
       Pentrefelin
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7NB
 01978 261424


 Places of Worship in Wrexham:
 The Cathedral Church Of Our Lady Of Sorrows (RC)
       Presbytery
       Regent Street
       Wrexham
       LL11 1RB
 01978 263943
 01978 352277
 www.wrexhamcathedral.org.uk


 Retail in Wrexham:
 ALDI Wrexham
       Plas Coch Retail Park
       Wrexham
       LL11 2BA
 0844 406 8800

 ASDA - Wrexham
       Holt Road
       Wrexham
       Clywd
       LL13 8HL
 01978 367200

 Co-op Convenience Shop
       Cross Lanes
       Wrexham
       Denbighshire
       LL13 0TR

 Co-op Late Shop
       1-3 Prince Charles Road
       Queens Park
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8YB

 Co-op Late Shop
       21 Poplar Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 7DG

 Co-op Late Shop
       81 Holt Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 8NG

 Co-op Late Shop
       12 Dean Road
       Rhosnesni
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13 9EH

 Co-op Late Shop
       5 Lord Street
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL11 1LG

 Lidl
       Salop Road
       Wrexham
       Clwyd
       LL13
 0870 444 1234

 Sainsbury's - Wrexham
       Plas Coch Road
       Plas Coch
       Wrexham
       Denbighshire
       LL11 2BW
 01978 262853


 Schools/Colleges in Wrexham:
 Alexandra School (Primary)
       Park Avenue
       Wrexham
       LL12 7AZ
 01978 315120

 Barker's Lane C.P. School (Primary)
       Barker's Lane
       Wrexham
       LL13 9TP
 01978 357754

 Caia Park Nursery School
       Prince Charles Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 8TH
 01978 356177

 Erddig Nursery School
       Erddig Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7DN
 01978 356140

 Rhosddu Primary School
       Price's Lane
       Wrexham
       LL11 2NB
 01978 266831

 St Anne's R.C. Primary
       Prince Charles Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 8TH
 01978 261623

 St Christopher's School (Special)
       Stockwell Grove
       Wrexham
       LL13 8NE
 01978 346910
 01978 346944

 St David's High School (Secondary)
       Rhosnesni Lane
       Wrexham
       LL13 9ET
 01978 265412

 St Giles Infants School
       Poplar Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7DG
 01978 356016

 St Giles Junior Controlled School
       Madeira Hill
       Wrexham
       LL13 7DG
 01978 266944

 St Joseph's Catholic High School (Secondary)
       Sontley Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7EN
 01978 265209
 01978 262165

 St Mary's R.C. Primary School
       Lea Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7NA
 01978 352406

 The Groves High School (Secondary)
       Penymaes Avenue
       Wrexham
       LL12 7AP
 01978 263945
 01978 365814

 Victoria Junior School
       Poyser Street
       Wrexham
       LL13 7RP
 01978 364189

 Wat's Dyke C.P. School (Primary)
       Garden Village
       Wrexham
       LL11 2TE
 01978 355731

 Woodlands Children's Development Centre (Independent)
       27 Pentrefelyn Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7NB
 01978 262777

 Yale College
       Grove Park Road
       Wrexham
       LL12 7AA
 01978 311794
 01978 291569
 admin@yale.ac.uk
 www.yale.ac.uk

 Ysgol Clywedog (Secondary)
       Ruthin Road
       Wrexham
       LL13 7UB
 01978 266775

 Ysgol Morgan Llwyd (Secondary)
       Ffordd Cefn
       Wrecsam
       LL13 9NG
 01978 315050
 01978 315051


Bell ringing at St Giles, Wrexham


Wrexham - From 'A Topographical Dictionary of Wales' (1849)
WREXHAM, a market-town, a parliamentary borough, the head of a union, and a parish chiefly in the hundred of Bromfield, county of Denbigh, in North Wales, 26 miles (S. E. by E.) from Denbigh, 18 (E. S. E.) from Ruthin, and 187½ (N. W.) from London; comprising the townships and chapelries of Bersham and Minera, the township and ecclesiastical district of Brymbo, and the townships of Abenbury-Vawr, Abenbury-Vechan (the latter township in the hundred of Maelor, county of Flint), Acton, Bieston, Borras-Hovah, Broughton, Esclusham Above, Esclusham Below, Gourton, Stansty, Wrexham-Abbot, and Wrexham-Regis; and containing 12,921 inhabitants, of whom 5818 are in the townships of Wrexham Abbot and Regis, forming the town. This place, which is of remote antiquity, is noticed in the Saxon Chronicle under the names of Wrightesham and Wrightelesham, from which its present appellation is most probably derived. From its situation on the eastern side of Clawdd Offa, or Offa's Dyke, it was enumerated among the towns of the Saxon kingdom of Mercia; but at a subsequent period it was included in the district called Welsh Maelor. Edward I. granted the town, together with the lordship of Bromfield and Yale, within which it was comprised, to John, Earl Warren; but scarcely any thing of historical importance appears to have distinguished it. In the reign of Henry VIII. it was noticed by Leland as a trading town, having some merchants and good buckler-makers. During the civil war in the time of Charles I., the church was converted into a temporary prison; and it is recorded that in March, 1646, some of the parliamentarian soldiers here mutinied for their pay, seized Colonel Jones, the treasurer, and others of the commissioners, and compelled Colonel Mytton, who had just entered the town, to make a hasty retreat to Holt Castle. The following notices in reference to this period are taken from a manuscript account of the civil war in North Wales, preserved in the Wynnstay library, and printed in the first number of the Archæologia Cambrensis: "The king came to Salop the 20th day of September, 1642; from thence hee went to Chester, and in his return he came to Wrexam, and vywed the trayn bands of Bromffield and Chirke [two hundreds in the county of Denbigh], 27th September. The king came again from Salop to Wrexam ye 3d of October, and vywed the traine bands of the hole county, who weare to marche the morrowe after to Shrewsbury for a gard to the Prince." "The 9th day of November, 1643, Holt-brige was taken by Sir Tho. Midleton and Sir Wm. Brerton, who presently entred Wrexam; and shortly after, Hawarden Castle was delivered to them."

The town is pleasantly and advantageously situated at the junction of the Shrewsbury, Welshpool, Oswestry, and Chester roads; on the line of the Shrewsbury and Chester railway; at the distance of little more than eleven miles from the latter place, and in the centre of the mining and manufacturing districts of the eastern part of Denbighshire. It consists of several spacious streets intersecting each other at right angles, the houses in which are in general neatly and substantially built; the town is paved, and lighted with gas, and the inhabitants are plentifully supplied with water. A small theatre is occasionally opened for dramatic performances; and races are annually held early in October, on a course a little north-west of the town, on the right of the road to Mold.

No particular branch of trade or manufacture is carried on in the town; but the parish, which is about twelve miles in length, and two and a half in breadth, abounds with mineral wealth, and extensive works of various kinds are conducted in different parts of it. There are some large paper-mills, situated on the banks of the river Clywedog. In the township of Minera are lead-mines and collieries: the working of the former, however, is suspended, owing to the great influx of water, notwithstanding the united power of several steam-engines, that were employed to draw it from the mines. The coalworks in this township, and also those in Broughton, Brymbo, Esclusham Above, and Minera, are upon a large scale, the city of Chester being principally supplied with coal from these places, and large quantities being exported from the railway-port of Saltney, on the river Dee. In the township of Brymbo are also important iron-works, established by the late John Wilkinson, Esq. The coal-mines generally vary from a hundred to a hundred and twenty yards in depth, and in some parts they are sunk to the depth of two hundred yards; the strata of coal vary from eighteen inches to fifteen feet in thickness. The ironstone of the district is found in detached nodules, in beds intermediate with and below the coal strata, and is of the usual kind of argillaceous ore, containing from thirty to thirty-five per cent. of metal; it is often smelted with a small portion of the richer hæmatitic ore from Ulverston, which is brought hither for that purpose, and is thought to improve its quality, being much prized for its peculiar tenacity. The iron-works in the parish had latterly been long in a neglected state, and appeared to be superseded by those in Ruabon and Gresford adjoining; but, as the ores both of lead and iron are rich and abundant, and the railway affords great facility of carriage, the works are again brought into active operation. A foundry for cannon was established at Bersham by the late John and William Wilkinson, Esqrs., from which not only our own Government, but some of the continental states, particularly Russia, were formerly supplied; these works are now in ruins, the only tenable part having been converted into a corn-mill. When the Ellesmere canal was projected, it was in contemplation to construct a branch from Pont-yCysylltau to Chester, through Broughton, Brymbo, &c.; but the plan was abandoned, owing to the want of water sufficient for a high level, and other circumstances; and before the construction of the railway, the only mode of conveyance was by land carriage to Chester. The railway has a branch to Minera, &c.

Markets are held on Thursday and Saturday, the former being the principal; and fairs take place on the Thursday after the second Wednesday in January, on March 23rd, Holy Thursday, June 16th, the Thursday after the second Wednesday in August, on September 19th, the third Thursday in October, and the Thursday after the second Wednesday in December. The March fair, which was the greatest in North Wales, commences on the 23rd, and lasts fourteen days. For the accommodation of the various dealers attending it, five extensive areas used to be fitted up with shops and booths: one of these commercial halls confers twenty-eight votes for the county upon its proprietors, who are principally inhabitants of Huddersfield. The fair used to be attended not only by those of the neighbouring district, but by tradesmen from distant parts of the kingdom. The chief commodities brought to it by the Welsh were, flannels of various qualities, linsey-woolseys, coarse linens, horses, cattle, and sheep; the dealers from remote places exposed for sale Irish linens, Yorkshire and other woollen cloths, and every variety of Birmingham, Sheffield, and Manchester manufactures. Of late years, however, the greater facilities for communication with the interior of Wales by improved roads, have caused this fair gradually to fall off, and comparatively few tradesmen now attend it. A commodious covered market has been recently erected on the north side of the High-street, in front of which is a large room intended for a cornexchange; the façade, in the Elizabethan style, is very imposing, and gives importance to the street and town.

By the act of 1832, to "Amend the Representation," Wrexham was made contributory with Denbigh, Holt, and Ruthin, in the return of a parliamentary member; the borough to consist of the two townships of Wrexham Abbot and Regis, with a very small detached portion of that of Esclusham Below, situated within the town. The elective franchise is vested in every person of full age occupying, either as owner, or as tenant under the same landlord, premises of the annual value of ten pounds or upwards, provided he be capable of registering as the act directs; the number of such tenements is 376. Wrexham is also one of the polling-places in the election of knights for the shire; and is under the jurisdiction of the county magistrates, who hold pettysessions in it every week. The county debt-court of Wrexham, established in 1847, has jurisdiction over part of the registration-district of Wrexham, and a small part of that of Ellesmere. This court and the petty-sessions are held in the town-hall, a large brick building at the top of the High-street; where formerly the courts of great sessions were held. There is a county bridewell or house of detention for prisoners before their commitment to the county gaol at Ruthin.

The living is a vicarage, rated in the king's books at £19. 9. 9½.; net income, £626; patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph; impropriator, Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart. The church, dedicated to St. Giles, is a spacious and venerable structure, in the later style of English architecture, deservedly regarded as one of the finest ecclesiastical edifices in the principality. The steeple of the original structure was blown down in 1331; and in 1457 the entire church was burnt. In order to promote the rebuilding of it, an indulgence of forty days, to be continued for five years, was granted to every one who contributed to the work; and the present edifice was erected, about 1472, the glass used in the windows having been brought from Normandy: the tower, however, was not finished till about the year 1506, as appears by a date on the building. Of late years, no fewer than 1550 sittings have been added, of which 900 are free, the Incorporated Society for erecting and enlarging churches and chapels having given the sum of £200 towards that purpose.

The exterior of the church is embellished with grotesque sculpture; and the tower, which is very lofty and highly enriched, consists of several successive stages, panelled throughout, and decorated with numerous statues of saints (among which is that of the patron, St. Giles) in canopied niches, elaborately wrought. From the loftiness of its elevation and the light open-work turrets by which it is crowned at the angles, the tower forms a conspicuous and very interesting object, as seen from any part of the surrounding country. The body of the church consists of a nave, chancel, and north and south aisles; the nave separated from the aisles by pillars and pointed arches, and lighted by a fine range of clerestory windows; the roof of carved oak richly ornamented, and supported by springers resting on embellished corbels. The chancel is divided from the nave by a curiously wrought iron railing, and is octangular at the east end; the roof appears to be of more ancient date than the roofs of the nave and aisles, and on one side are three stone stalls elaborately sculptured. The fine brazen eagle formerly used as a readingdesk, purchased for the parish by John ab Grufydd ab Davydd, of Ystiva, in 1524, is still preserved, and is occupied by the clerk during the performance of the communion service. Extensive alterations and embellishments have been made in the chancel within the last eight years. The east window, which had been filled up with an incongruous Grecian screen, within which was a painting of the Last Supper, presented by Elihu Yale, of Plâs Gronow, has been re-opened, and, with the smaller windows on the sides, filled with beautifully stained glass by Evans, of Shrewsbury: the two side windows contain fine figures of St. Peter and St. Paul. The old screen is replaced by one of correct pointed design, executed by Jones, of Chester, in Bath stone. Elihu Yale also gave to the church a painting of David playing on the Harp.

Among the most ancient of the monuments is that of a knight in complete armour: at the feet is a dog, and beyond it a dragon, with the point of the tail terminating in a serpent's head; on the shield is a lion rampant, and around it an inscription of which only the words "Hic jacet" are legible. In the chancel is an altar-tomb, on which is a recumbent effigy of Dr. Bellot, successively Bishop of Bangor and of Chester, in his episcopal robes: he died at Bersham, in the parish, in 1596; his funeral was celebrated at Chester, but his body, according to particular request, was interred here. Nearly opposite to this tomb is an exquisite and highly interesting monument, by Roubilliac, to the memory of Mrs. Mary Myddelton, of Chirk Castle, in which she is represented rising from the tomb in all the freshness of youth and beauty; above is a shattered pyramid, with a cypress-tree, and near it an angel with a trumpet. At the corner of the aisle is a monument, also by Roubilliac, to the Rev. Thomas Myddelton and Arabella his wife; their profiles are finely executed on medallions, with a curtain, partly drawn aside, the drapery of which is exquisitely sculptured. There are also monuments of very good design and elaborate execution, to William Lloyd, Esq., and his son; to the Fitz-Hughs, the Pulestons, the Longuevilles, and others; with a superb monument near the organ, of Bath stone, and of pointed design, executed by Jones, of Chester, to the memory of Sir Foster and Lady Cunliffe, who lived together in this neighbourhood upwards of fifty years. In the churchyard is the tomb of Elihu Yale, governor of Madras, whose singular epitaph represents him as born in America, bred in Europe, to have travelled through Africa, and to have been married in Asia: of other tombs deserving of notice, one, bearing a curious inscription, records the interment of Daniel Jones, parish-clerk of Wrexham, who died in 1668. At Bersham-Drelincourt, Brymbo, and Minera, are separate incumbencies. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, Baptists, Independents, Calvinistic Methodists, and Presbyterians, and a Roman Catholic chapel, in the parish.

The Free grammar school was instituted in 1603, by Valentine Broughton, alderman of Chester, who endowed it with £10 per annum, afterwards increased by a rent-charge of £3 from Mrs. Gwen Eyton, and by £5 interest from a bequest of £100 by Ralph Weld. The income thus amounts to £18 per annum, of which £14 are paid to the master on condition of his teaching six boys gratuitously, on their being nominated by the trustees. He is allowed to take pay-scholars, and to receive boarders; the present school-buildings comprise an excellent residence, with a garden adjoining, for the master, and two schoolrooms capable of accommodating 190 scholars. A free school for boys and girls was founded and endowed by Lady Dorothy Jeffreys, who by will dated 1728 left £400 for the purpose, with which, and a sum of £120 previously bequeathed by her daughter Margaret for a similar object, and an accumulation of interest on both sums, an estate was purchased for £822 in the parish of Holt, containing 69½ acres, and now yielding a rent of £100. The boys' school was until lately held in an indifferent building that had been originally a barn, but recently this has been demolished, and the site thrown into the cattle-market; and a new schoolroom, much more spacious and convenient, has been erected in lieu of it. The girls' school is held in a large and commodious apartment, built in the year 1817: both schools are conducted on the National plan. In Brook-street are very excellent schoolrooms in the Elizabethan style, built in 1844, at an expense of £1200, on land the gift of A. W. Thornely, Esq.: the schools are for boys and girls, and are taught on the system of the British and Foreign School Society. There is another British School in Chester-street, for boys only, with an endowment of £35 a year from Dr. Daniel Williams's charity. Other schools are supported in the town and parish, and about thirty Sunday schools are held in this populous district: two new schools and master's houses were built in the year 1849, from the designs of Mr. Penson, architect, of Oswestry. On the Mold road, a handsome infirmary and a savings'-bank, both in the Grecian style, have been erected within the last ten years.

There are considerable funds, arising from bequests and donations, for distribution among the poor of the parish; to whom have been left lands containing 12½ acres, now producing £14 per annum, (partly, however, for the benefit of the poor of Holt,) by Gerrard Barber, in 1660; a similar bequest by Elizabeth Jones, in 1663, yielding £3 per annum; a most liberal bequest in the same year by John Hughes of Rhos Ddû, of the lands of Eythen Ddû in the township of Bieston, comprising about 63½ acres, worth £124 a year; and a grant made by Jane Eyton, of above 14½ acres of land in the parish of Holt, paying a rent of £24, but £2 of which she directed to be paid to the poor of Ruabon. In addition were various consolidated gifts, with which two purchases of land were made, that now yield a rental of £46 per annum. The total amount of all these charities is £204, the distribution of which for the use of the poor and the purposes of the parish is regulated by the vestry, generally at Christmas. Connected with the Presbyterian communion is a grant by Elizabeth Roberts, sister and heiress of the above Dr. Williams, who in 1752 advanced £175, with which six cottages and their appurtenances were bought in the town, now producing a rental of £37. 14., divided among widows and others of the Presbyterian denomination. The same lady created an annual rent-charge of £60, which is allotted to ministers of different congregations, except £2 given to the clerk of Chester-street chapel, Wrexham, and a like sum to its poor. In 1812 a munificent bequest was made by Mr. Joshua Hughes, a native of this place and a merchant of Jamaica, who gave £2000, the interest to be annually divided among six of the poorest housekeepers: the principal is vested in the three per cent. consolidated Bank annuities, the yearly dividends amounting to £82. 8. 9.; and three persons are selected from the town, and three from the rural district, to enjoy the gift. In 1815, Ann Roberts left £100, the interest to be distributed on Christmas-day among twenty widows of Wrexham parish. The parish is also entitled to receive £2 annually for the benefit of a child, from the Rev. George Smith's charity at Northop.

The poor-law union of which this town is the head, was formed March 30th, 1837, and comprises the following fifty-six parishes and townships; namely, the townships of Bangor (parish of Bangor-Iscoed) and Abenbury-Vechan (parish of Wrexham), the chapelry of Tryddin (parish of Mold), the extra-parochial district of Threapwood, and the parishes of Erbistock, Hope, and Worthenbury, in the county of Flint: the townships of Eyton, Pickhill, Ryton, and Sesswick, in the parish of Bangor-Iscoed; of Allington, Borras-Riffrey, Burton, Erddig, Erlas, Gresford, Gwersylt, Llay, and Merford with Hoseley, in the parish of Gresford; of Cacca-Dutton, DuttonDifieth, Dutton-y-Brân, Holt, Ridley, and Sutton, in the parish of Holt; the chapelries of BershamDrelincourt and Minera, and the townships of Abenbury-Vawr, Acton, Bieston, Borras-Hovah, Broughton, Brymbo, Esclusham Above and Below, Gourton, Stansty, Wrexham-Abbot, and Wrexham-Regis, in the parish of Wrexham; and the parishes of Marchwiel and Ruabon; all in the shire of Denbigh: and the townships of Agden, Bradley, Chidlow, Chorlton, Cuddington, Malpas, Newton-juxta-Malpas, Oldcastle, Overton, Stockton, Wichaugh, and Wigland, in the parish of Malpas; and of ShocklachChurch and Shocklach-Oviatt, in the parish of Shocklach; all in the county of Chester. The union is under the superintendence of sixty-one guardians, and contains a population of 39,542, of whom 36,751 are in the Welsh portion.

Offa's Dyke is to be traced in various parts of the parish: it is plainly visible in Esclusham, which, in reference to it, is divided into Esclusham above and Esclusham below Dyke; it also intersects the township of Broughton, and, in every part of the parish in which it appears, is in a very perfect state, but particularly in the grounds of Pentre Bychan and Plâs Power. Wat's Dyke passes along the western boundary of the town of Wrexham, and, taking a northern course, is continued through the township of Stansty to the river Alyn, near which it enters Llay, in the parish of Gresford. The remains of two Roman baths were discovered in the town, in the year 1806.

In the vicinity are numerous gentlemen's seats, for which, even in the time of Churchyard the poet (celebrated as the author of the "Worthiness of Wales," &c., and who died early in the seventeenth century), it was peculiarly distinguished. Among the seats in the more immediate neighbourhood are, Pentre Bychan, Plâs Power, Cevn, Acton Park, Erddig, and Brymbo Hall. Acton Park, once the seat of the family of Jeffreys, and the birthplace of the notorious judge of that name, is a spacious mansion delightfully situated in extensive grounds, richly diversified with picturesque and romantic scenery, and commanding views over the town and the adjacent country, which abounds with features of interest. The hanging woods in the domain of Erddig are deservedly the theme of general admiration: the mansion, which is approached from the Ruabon road, has been considerably enlarged and modernised; in the saloon and other apartments are many fine paintings, and the library contains a large number of Welsh manuscripts, including the valuable Seabright collection. Brymbo Hall, said to have been from a design by Inigo Jones, is a fine specimen of domestic architecture, and embraces the most extensive prospect in the neighbourhood. There are several other seats in the adjoining parishes, in the accounts of which they are respectively noticed. In the vicinity of the town are also the remains of many old mansions, now occupied only as farmhouses; among which are, Cadwgan; Havod-y-Wern, formerly the residence of the Pulestons; and Esclusham Hall, also a seat of that family.

Mr. Edward Randles, organist at Wrexham, towards the close of the last and early in the present century, although blind, was one of the most skilful performers on the harp in the kingdom; and his daughter, Elizabeth, was an unexampled prodigy of juvenile proficiency in music; having had the honour, when only three years and a half old, of performing on the piano-forte before the royal family.



 

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