Laverbread

Laverbread. Photograph © Vivien

Laver Bread
The seaweed (Porphyra Umilicalis) is delicious when fried in bacon fat and is a rich source of vitamins and iodine.

Laverbread (Welsh: Bara Lawr) is a traditional Welsh delicacy made from the seaweed laver.

Laver is used traditionally in the Welsh diet and still eaten widely across Wales in the form of laverbread. The seaweed is boiled for several hours: the gelatinous paste that results is then rolled in oatmeal and fried. Laverbread is traditionally eaten fried with bacon and cockles for breakfast. Swansea market has several stalls selling only laverbread and cockles from the nearby Gower Peninsula. The source of the seaweed used to make laverbread was historically the Gower coastline. There are still small producers of Gower laverbread, but most commercial laverbread is now made from seaweed gathered from western Scotland.

Laver is highly nutritious because of its high proportions of protein, iron, and especially iodine. It also contains high levels of vitamins B2, A, D and C.

Recipe
Fresh Laverbread With Lemon And Croutons


Introduction

This is such an unusual ingredient from the sea. Chefs and food producers these days find it to be a versatile ingredient – adding it to soups, sauces, stuffings, breads, pastas and even cheese. Traditionally it is mixed with fine or coarse oatmeal and fried in bacon fat. This recipe gives it the caviar treatment, although it is not fishy at all, and not as salty.

Serves 1

Ingredients

  • 50g/2oz fresh laver per person
  • Garnishes- Lemon wedges Chives Toast or fried bread triangles Shredded leek,
    poached

Method
This recipe is simple, just serve the above ingredients as they are. It is a wonderful way to experience the unique flavour of laverbread.

Recipe listed by the kind permission of the WDA

Visit our Welsh Laver Bread Producers page